How does using the lens of intersectionality help you comprehend the impact of individuals working together across social movements in the first half of the 19th century?

How does using the lens of intersectionality help you comprehend the impact of individuals working together across social movements in the first half of the 19th century?
April 12, 2021 No Comments Assignment Assignment help

For this first essay, you will create a 4-5-page claim-driven argument using one of the course readings below, responding to the following prompt: How does using the lens of intersectionality help you comprehend the impact of individuals working together across social movements in the first half of the 19th century? Here are some questions to consider: How did certain activists within the Anti-Slavery Movement, Women’s Rights Movement, and Indigenous Rights Movement work together to resist system of oppression? How were there efforts opposed by individuals in those same movements? How did individuals working together from various movements benefit the cause they were advocating for? What conflicts arose from the efforts to work across gender and racial divisions? How did the efforts of the abolition and Indigenous rights activists help you better understand the benefits and challenges of intersectional activism as we have discussed in this class? How does using an intersectionality lens help you comprehend the complexities that developed as women involved themselves into the anti-slavery movement in the first half of the 19th-century? Tip: Consider what opportunities and challenges developed as a result of the intersecting of these socially constructed identities. Readings: Select ONE Of the following readings to focus on in your Essay #1: Natalie Joy, “The Indian’s Cause: Abolitionists and Native American Rights,” Journal of the Civil War Era, June 2018, vol.8, no. 2, pp. 215-242. (pdf available in Week 1 Module) Jennifer Rycenga, “A Greater Awakening: Women’s Intellect as a Factor in Early Abolitionist Movements, 1824-1834,” Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion, Fall 2005, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 31-59. (pdf available in Week 1 Module) Skills: Hone close reading skills. Include accurate summaries of issues & course reading. Demonstrate developing a claim or assertion that is narrow, original, arguable, and important. Address the prompt Support the argument with evidence from a course text. Use PIE Paragraphing Integrate quotes (of at least three direct quotes from selected course text). Use Parenthetical Citations and a Works Cited page following MLA guidelines. Task: Write a 4-5-page (1000-1250 words) academic argument that makes a narrow, original, arguable, important claim or assertion about new insights you have gained about intersectionality from analyzing Joy’s or Rycenga’s articles. This paper is the most classic academic essay there is—the argument and analysis paper. The process is pretty simple: You will start with an argumentative claim that you want to make about intersectionality from your close reading of Joy’s or Rycenga’s articles. Next, you will find evidence from reading that supports that position. Then, you will develop an essay that analyzes those examples using the PIE Paragraph method to support the argument you want to make. Claim/Thesis: Whichever reading you choose to develop your argument, you will need to articulate a more specific claim or assertion about the impact of intersectionality to formulate your thesis. For example, you would want to develop a thesis that states more specifically what the impact of individuals working together across social movements are. To note that they did work together would be a summary. How can you make your assertion about the impact of that–what opportunities and challenges developed as a result of the intersecting of these socially constructed identities. Evidence: Academic argumentation is rooted in evidence. In this instance, your evidence should come from a careful reading of Joy’s or Rycenga’s articles (integrate specific quotations from the reading using PIE paragraphs, formatted according to MLA in-text citation format). Your reading or interpretation of the selected course text should serve as your evidence, forming the building blocks for the body of the essay. Audience: For this writing situation, your audience consists of your instructors, your peers, and other scholars that make up the US academy.